Banking » Savings » Savings Goals By Age: How To Set Them Smartly?
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Savings Goals By Age: How To Set Them Smartly?

Setting and prioritizing savings goals is very important for your future. Here are the common goals for every age - and tips to achieve them
Author: Baruch Mann (Silvermann)
Baruch Mann (Silvermann)

Writer, Contributor

Experience

Baruch Silvermann is a financial expert, experienced analyst, and founder of The Smart Investor.  Silvermann has contributed to Yahoo Finance and cited as an authoritative source in financial outlets like Forbes, Business Insider, CNBC Select, CNET, Bankrate, Fox Business, The Street, and more.
Interest Rates Last Update: April 15, 2024
The banking product interest rates, including savings, CDs, and money market, are accurate as of this date.
Author: Baruch Mann (Silvermann)
Baruch Mann (Silvermann)

Writer, Contributor

Experience

Baruch Silvermann is a financial expert, experienced analyst, and founder of The Smart Investor.  Silvermann has contributed to Yahoo Finance and cited as an authoritative source in financial outlets like Forbes, Business Insider, CNBC Select, CNET, Bankrate, Fox Business, The Street, and more.
Interest Rates Last Update: April 15, 2024

The banking product interest rates, including savings, CDs, and money market, are accurate as of this date.

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Table Of Content

What Are Savings Goals?

Savings goals are specific financial objectives that you set for yourself to achieve through saving money over a certain period of time.

Savings goals can be short-term or long-term, and can vary depending on your financial situation, lifestyle, and priorities. Some common examples of savings goals might include:

  • Building an emergency fund to cover unexpected expenses
  • Saving for a down payment on a home or car
  • Putting money aside for a vacation or other large purchase
  • Saving for retirement or other long-term investments

Having specific savings goals can help you stay motivated and focused on your financial priorities, and can help you make more informed decisions about how to save and invest your money.

It's important to set realistic savings goals that are attainable within your current financial means, and to regularly evaluate your progress towards those goals to make sure you're on track.

What Are The Most Common Savings Goals By Age?

Naturally, the savings goals of a 20-year-old who just finish college is not the same as someone who has been working for 30 years and saved for some big aspects of life. 

In order to make it relevant for everyone, we summarized the most common savings goals by age. Of course, everyone has their own priorities and preferences, so make sure to make adjustments to your personal situation.

Savings Goals In Your 20's

Here are two common savings goals for 20-year-olds,  why they're important, how much you should generally save and what are the biggest challenges:

An emergency fund is a crucial financial safety net that can help you cover unexpected expenses, such as medical bills or car repairs, without going into debt or dipping into other savings. It's especially important to have an emergency fund in your 20s, when unexpected expenses can be particularly damaging to your finances.

The rule of thumb is to save at least 3-6 months' worth of living expenses in your emergency fund. Depending on your income and expenses, this could amount to several thousand dollars.

The biggest challenge in building an emergency fund is often getting started. It can be difficult to prioritize saving for emergencies when you have other financial goals, but it's important to make it a priority.

If you have student loans, paying them off should be a top financial priority in your 20s. High levels of student debt can be a significant burden on your finances, limiting your ability to save for other goals or make major purchases.

One of the biggest challenges in paying off student loans is that it can take many years to pay off the debt, which can be demotivating. It's important to stay focused and remember that every dollar you put towards your loans is a step towards financial freedom.

Consider using a debt repayment calculator to help you stay motivated and track your progress.

saving goals in your 20s
Building an emergency fund is one of the top priority saving goals when you're young (Photo by Krakenimages.com/Shutterstock)

Savings Goals In Your 30's And 40's

It doesn't really matter if you're in your 30's or 40's, usually – your savings goals will be similar. Here's what to know:

Buying a home is often a major life goal for people in their 30s, but it can be a costly endeavor. Saving for a down payment can help you qualify for a better mortgage rate and reduce the amount of interest you'll pay over the life of your loan.

The ideal down payment varies based on the cost of the home you are looking to buy and the mortgage you are looking to qualify for, but typically ranges from 10-20% of the home's purchase price.

One of the biggest challenges in saving for a down payment is that it can take time to accumulate the necessary funds. Additionally, finding affordable housing in many markets can be challenging, so you may need to adjust your expectations or consider buying a smaller or less expensive home than you originally envisioned.

Investing in stocks, bonds, and other assets can help you build long-term wealth and achieve financial independence. As a 30 or 40 year old, you still have many years to benefit from compound interest and can take advantage of the power of long-term investments.

One of the biggest challenges in investing is that it can be overwhelming to figure out where to start. It's important to educate yourself on the basics of investing, such as asset allocation and diversification, and to seek professional advice if you're not comfortable making investment decisions on your own

If you have children, saving for their education can help them avoid the burden of student loans and give them a strong financial foundation.

Even if you don't have children yet, starting to save early can help you take advantage of the power of compound interest and provide a safety net for future expenses.

 The amount you should save depends on the cost of the college or university your child may attend and how much you can afford to save each month. A common benchmark is to save 1/3 of the estimated cost of college by the time your child reaches age 18.

By your 30s and 40s, you may have accumulated a significant amount of debt from various sources, such as credit cards, car loans, or student loans. Paying off debts can help you reduce your overall financial burden and free up money for other goals.

The amount you should save to pay off debt depends on the type and amount of debt you have. A good starting point is to focus on paying off high-interest debts first and then allocate any extra money towards paying off other debts.

By the time you reach your 35-40s, retirement is likely starting to feel more tangible and pressing. It's important to continue saving for retirement to ensure that you have enough money to support your lifestyle when you stop working. Aim to save at least 15-20% of your income for retirement, if possible.

 One of the biggest challenges in saving for retirement in your 35-40s is catching up if you haven't started saving yet. If you haven't been saving for retirement, it can be difficult to prioritize this goal when you have other financial obligations, such as paying off debt or saving for your children's education.

It's important to make saving for retirement a top priority and to take advantage of catch-up contributions if you're over age 50.

most important savings goal: retirement
Aim to save at least 15-20% of your income for retirement, if possible

Savings Goals In Your 50's

While it's difficult to confess, you're closer to retirement than ever. Consequently, here are the common savings goals:

Paying off your mortgage can provide a sense of financial security and reduce your monthly expenses, which can help you save more for other goals, such as retirement.

The amount you should save to pay off your mortgage depends on the remaining balance, interest rate, and the amount of time remaining on the mortgage. Consider creating a payoff plan with the help of a financial advisor to determine how much to pay and when.

Paying off your mortgage early may require sacrifices in other areas of your budget, such as cutting back on entertainment or travel.

As you age, health care expenses become more important to consider in your financial planning. It's important to save for potential health care expenses in retirement to ensure that you have the necessary funds to cover medical costs.

 One of the biggest challenges in saving for health care expenses in retirement is that health care costs are often unpredictable and can be very expensive.

Consider consulting with a financial advisor to help you make informed decisions about health care savings and to explore options such as long-term care insurance.

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How To Prioritize Savings Goals?

Prioritizing savings goals can be a challenging task, especially when you have multiple financial objectives that are equally important. Here are some steps to help you prioritize your savings goals:

  • Identify your goals: Make a list of your financial goals, both short-term and long-term. Examples of short-term goals may include building an emergency fund, paying off debt, or saving for a vacation. Long-term goals may include saving for retirement, a child's education, or a down payment on a home.

  • Determine the urgency of each goal: Some goals may be more urgent than others. Evaluate each goal based on its timeline and importance to your financial stability.

  • Evaluate the potential impact of each goal: Consider the potential impact of achieving each goal. For example, paying off debt can improve your credit score and increase your financial stability, while investing in retirement can help you achieve financial independence in the future.

  • Consider the cost of not achieving a goal: Consider the potential consequences of not achieving a particular goal. For example, not saving enough for retirement can result in a lower quality of life during retirement.

  • Assess your financial resources: Determine how much money you can realistically allocate towards each goal. Consider your current income, expenses, and other financial obligations.

  • Create a prioritized plan: Use the information you have gathered to create a prioritized plan for achieving your goals. Focus on the goals that are most urgent and have the greatest potential impact. Allocate your financial resources accordingly and adjust your plan as needed.

Remember that financial priorities can change over time, so it's important to regularly reassess your goals and adjust your plan as needed.

How To Set Savings Goals: Tips

Here are some tips for setting smart savings goals:

  • Start by Identifying Your Priorities: Before setting savings goals, it's important to identify what's most important to you. We've summarized how to do it in the section above.

  • Make Your Goals Specific, Measurable, and Time-Bound: To set effective savings goals, make sure they are specific, measurable, and time-bound. This means setting a clear dollar amount, timeline, and measurement criteria for each goal. For example, instead of setting a goal to “save more money,” set a goal to “save $5,000 in an emergency fund by the end of the year.”

  • Break Down Your Goals into Manageable Steps: Large savings goals can be overwhelming, but breaking them down into smaller, manageable steps can help make them more achievable. Consider setting monthly or quarterly goals that lead up to your larger, long-term goal.

  • Automate Your Savings: Automating your savings is an effective way to make sure you're making progress towards your goals without having to think about it. Set up automatic transfers from your checking account to your savings account or retirement account each month to ensure you're consistently putting money towards your goals.

  • Regularly Evaluate Your Progress: It's important to regularly evaluate your progress towards your savings goals to make sure you're on track. Consider reviewing your finances monthly or quarterly and adjusting your goals or strategy as necessary.

  • Be Realistic: It's important to set goals that are achievable given your current financial situation. Don't set savings goals that are so ambitious that you can't realistically meet them. This can lead to frustration and disappointment.

  • Seek Professional Advice: If you're struggling to set or achieve your savings goals, consider seeking advice from a financial advisor. A professional can help you create a personalized financial plan and give you guidance on how to achieve your goals.

What Are The Best Savings Tools Keep My Savings?

There are several savings tools that you can use to keep your savings. Here are some of the most common savings tools:

  • Savings Accounts: A savings account is a basic type of bank account that is designed for saving money that can be opened quickly. Most savings accounts are FDIC insured, which means that your money is protected up to $250,000 per depositor, per institution. Savings accounts typically offer lower interest rates than other savings tools, but they are a safe and convenient place to store your money.

  • Certificates of Deposit (CDs): A CD is a type of savings tool that offers a fixed interest rate for a specified period of time. CDs typically offer higher interest rates than savings accounts or money market accounts, but they require you to keep your money in the account for a set period of time, which can range from a few months to several years. During this time, you can't add more money to your CD.

  • Treasury Securities: Treasury securities, such as Treasury bills, notes, and bonds, are issued by the U.S. government and are considered one of the safest types of investments. 

  • Investment Accounts: Investment accounts, such as brokerage accounts or IRA accounts, can be used to save for long-term financial goals, such as retirement. These accounts may offer a higher potential return on investment than traditional savings tools, but they also come with higher risk.

FAQs

It's crucial to set savings goals since it provides motivation – goals give you a sense of purpose and motivation to save money. Also ,create a roadmap for your financial journey – they help you identify where you are today and where you want to be in the future.

Lastly and most imortant – Setting goals helps you measure your progress and see how far you've come. By tracking your progress, you can adjust your savings strategy if needed to help ensure that you stay on track.

 

Short-term savings goals are typically goals that you want to achieve within the next year or two. Long-term savings goals are typically goals that you want to achieve over a longer period of time, typically several years or even decades.

Tracking your savings goals is an important part of achieving them. Consider using a spreadsheet or financial app to track your savings goals. You can create a table with each of your goals, the target amount, the amount saved so far, and the deadline.

Don't forget to review your progress towards your savings goals regularly, such as monthly or quarterly. This will help you identify any areas where you need to adjust your strategy and help keep you motivated.

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Picture of Baruch Mann (Silvermann)

Baruch Mann (Silvermann)

Baruch Silvermann is a financial expert, experienced analyst, and founder of The Smart Investor.  Silvermann has contributed to Yahoo Finance and cited as an authoritative source in financial outlets like Forbes, Business Insider, CNBC Select, CNET, Bankrate, Fox Business, The Street, and more.
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