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Balloon Mortgage Pros And Cons: Should you Go For It?

What sets a balloon mortgage apart from other loans is that it does not fully amortize over the life of the loan. While this kind of loan can be great for some people, it can be a disastrous for other. In this article, we've summarized the pros and cons of a balloon mortgage - is it the right move for you?
Author: Russell White
Russell White

Writer, Contributor

Experience

As a finance geek and Content editor with 13 years of journalism experience, Russell makes sure every article has the right flow, edits for accuracy, and consumer value. In addition, Russell contributes his own ideas about budgeting, savings, and credit cards.

Review & Fact Check: Baruch Mann (Silvermann)

Baruch Mann (Silvermann)

Financial Expert, The Smart Investor CEO

Experience

Baruch Mann (Silvermann) is a financial expert and founder of The Smart Investor. Above all, he is passionate about teaching people how to manage their money and helping millions on their journey to a better financial future.
Author: Russell White
Russell White

Writer, Contributor

Experience

As a finance geek and Content editor with 13 years of journalism experience, Russell makes sure every article has the right flow, edits for accuracy, and consumer value. In addition, Russell contributes his own ideas about budgeting, savings, and credit cards.

Review & Fact Check: Baruch Mann (Silvermann)

Baruch Mann (Silvermann)

Financial Expert, The Smart Investor CEO

Experience

Baruch Mann (Silvermann) is a financial expert and founder of The Smart Investor. Above all, he is passionate about teaching people how to manage their money and helping millions on their journey to a better financial future.

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Many people would rather forget the Great Recession that began in 2008 with the collapse of the housing market due to the subprime mortgage crisis.  But monumental disasters like this, especially when the economy gets hit really bad, are not easily forgotten.

In fact, people will still remember that under all the rubble, there are thousands of balloon loans gone bad that serve as the villain that started in all.  Today, many do not fully understand what a balloon loan is and how a seemingly simple loan could nearly cause the collapse of major economies.

For many people their mortgage is their largest debt. Mortgages are the most common way to finance a property purchase and according to Experian, mortgage loan debt in the USA is steadily on the increase. In this chart, using the Experian data, you can see that over the last ten years, mortgage loan debt has increased from $8.2 trillion in 2010 to $9.5 trillion in 2019. Although there was a dip in 2011 and 2012, overall there has been a general upward trend.

Mortgage Loan Debt (Trillions)

Balloon Mortgage Overview

What sets a balloon mortgage apart from other loans is that it does not fully amortize over the life of the loan. A balloon mortgage is loan with a low or no monthly payment term that ends with the borrower having to pay off the entire total in one lump sum.

Ideally, the borrower will make payments over a pre-determined period of time (usually five or seven years) then, at the end of that period, pays for the full remaining balance of the loan at once. Obviously, you can surmise that the remaining balance would be huge, hence the term “balloon payment”.

The interesting appeal of balloon loans is that borrowers pay interest for the first few years and make no payment for the principal.  It is no wonder why many finance people also call them ‘interest only’ loans.  In a traditional loan, you know that your monthly payments will apply for both the interest for the month and partial principal of the loan.

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So, you can see that this scheme calls for a much lower monthly payment on the part of the borrower.  Normally, you take a balloon loan structure for mortgages but it is not unusual for borrowers to use the scheme for other types of large loans such as auto loans.

To get the monthly payments on balloon loans, lenders usually divide the loan over a standard 30-year period but some lenders use other computation methods such as interest only. Some balloon mortgages have a “reset” option which takes effect at the end of the loan.

When the borrower requests for a reset, it means that he wants the lender to automatically recalculate the mortgage at the current interest rate. However, when no such option has been provided, it could mean that the buyer will either sell or refinance the home before the end of the term.

Balloon Mortgage – Example #1

Let’s say that a buyer gets a seven-year balloon mortgage to buy a home.  The lender will then require him to make equal monthly payments at a fixed interest rate for seven years. Often, the rate will be considerably lower than a traditional mortgage loan.

At the end of the seven years, the lender will ask the borrower to pay the remainder of the balance of the loan.  The borrower can either pay it in full or refinance the loan with the lender (or a different lender) or simply sell the house.

Balloon Mortgage – Example #2

Let’s look at what’s going to happen if a borrower takes out a balloon loan for $300,000 with a term of 7 years and an interest rate of 4.5% with an amortization period of 30 years.  He will not be paying off the loan for that entire 30 years but will only make payments for seven years.  He would then be left with a balance of $262,598 after 84 months of making payment.

This will be the total amount that the borrower will have to pay as a lump-sum payment.

Balloon Mortgage Payment Schedule – Example

Consider the following example based on a $250,000 balloon mortgage, provided at 4% with a 6-year term and a 30-year amortization:

MonthPayment AmountPrincipalInterestBalance Remaining
1$1,193.54$360.21$833.33$249,639.79
2$1,193.54$361.41$832.13$249,278.38
3$1,193.54$362.61$830.93$248,915.77
70$1,193.54$453.18$740.36$221,654.00
71$1,193.54$454.69$738.85$221,199.31
72$1,193.54$456.21$737.33220,743.10

The borrower would make regular monthly payments of $1,193.54 according to the plan above. The loan would be totally repaid if the borrower made those payments for 30 years. This loan, however, is just for five years. The borrower would be left with a balance of $220,743.10 at the end of the five-year loan period, which they would be obliged to pay in one single amount.

Mortgage debt accounts for the majority of consumer debt. This 2020 NAR Trends chart highlights that the average mortgage loan debt has steadily increased between 2015 and 2019. The total four year increase in this segment is a significant 10%. This suggests a trend of increasing mortgage debt that correlates with the rising house prices.

Average Mortgage Loan Debt

The Pros and Cons of Balloon Mortgages

For borrowers who are looking for low and fixed interest rates on their loans, this is a fitting financing scheme.  This is also a type of mortgage that is comparatively shorter than other types of loans because it normally lasts only for 5 to 7 years. A serious word of caution though:  expect a huge remaining loan balance at the end of the term that the borrower has to pay in full.

So, if you’re a homebuyer who expects to receive a windfall or is looking to get a higher income within the next few years, this could be for you.  Or, if you’re an individual who often relocates or one who is not planning to stay in your newly acquired home for a long time can probably benefit from this kind of mortgage.

balloon mortgage pros and cons

Here are the primary benefits as well as risks that normally come with this home financing method:

Balloon Mortgage – Advantages

Affordable Initial Amount

First off, what attracts borrowers to take this type of loan is the low down payment.  This feature actually widens the eligibility scope of the loan because more people can now qualify to avail of financing.

So, for borrowers who may be low on cash at the moment but are expecting a huge amount to come in within the next 5 to 7 years, this alternative home financing scheme is very appropriate for them.

Low-Interest Rates

It’s pretty obvious that if you get a low-interest loan rate, your monthly payments would also be low.  This is especially favorable for a borrower who intends to sell the house later because every cost, including interest, that you sink into the house could potentially reduce the profit.

And if you plan to stay in the house, you would want to minimize the payments so you can save some money for the lump sum when the balloon payment becomes due or to refinance a smaller amount.

Easy To Qualify

When you compare the eligibility requirements between a balloon mortgage and a traditional loan, it’s easier for most people to qualify for the former.  This means that many more borrowers will have the chance to get their own home.

This is especially attractive for people who are confident that they can refinance before the end of the term because of an impending upward shift in their financial situation such as an anticipated spike in their regular income.

Future Refinancing

It is plausible that some borrowers may be unable to pay their remaining balance in full at the end of the mortgage term.  In such a case with a balloon mortgage, they can reapply for a resetting or refinancing of their loan balances.  There is a catch though:  lenders will refinance using the prevailing market rates and not the lower original loan rates.

So, borrowers will have to make higher monthly payments than the ones they used to make on their original loans.

Balloon Mortgage – Disadvantages

Higher Foreclosure Risk

Foreclosure is always a risk regardless of the type of home financing but it is significantly higher in the case of a balloon mortgage. It is easy to see outright where the problems might arise.

First, when the maturity date comes, the lump sum becomes due and the borrower might not have the money to pay for the balance of his loan.  Second, when the borrower is not able to qualify for a refinancing.  This will make things more difficult and heighten the risk of foreclosure.

In the 2008 mortgage crisis, a material number of borrowers with balloon mortgages went through foreclosure because they were not able to pay for the remaining balance of their loans.  Many failed to get refinancing and because of the crisis, it was almost impossible to get a good price for your house let alone be able to sell it.

Easy To Qualify

It’s really tempting for many borrowers to be able to avail of a loan without having to go through a difficult screening process.  For those who have no comfortable assurance of being able to afford lump sum payment on the maturity date, this could spell big trouble without them realizing it.

They could find themselves under pressure down the road to sell at a loss or letting go of their home due to foreclosure.  Of course, they might get lucky and sell it at a gain but that is essentially wishful thinking.  Perhaps it’s an effective way to learn a valuable lesson or two in prudence and planning – but they still have to deal with the fact that they’ve lost their home because of their own undoing.

Huge Payment at Once

This is probably the most compelling reason why you should not just jump right in and get a balloon loan:  you will have to make a substantial payment at maturity.  So, if you really want this type of mortgage, you have to be absolutely certain that by the end of the term, you will have enough money to pay off the balance – otherwise, you’ll be setting yourself up for a disaster.

Just remember that a typical family with an average income may find it nearly impossible to raise that kind of money within 5 to 7 years to sufficiently cover the balloon payment.

Conclusion

From all angles, balloon loans are undoubtedly a whole lot riskier than traditional loans.  If your primary aim is to bring down your housing costs as low as you possibly can and you are confident that you can get out before the balloon payment becomes due, then you can go for it.  However, if your financial situation is a bit shaky and you’re the type of person who would worry to death that you won’t be able to refinance or sell in time, think twice and hard.  You may be better off going for a traditional loan.

Planning how to purchase your house should depend on what you plan on doing with it and how you intend to pay off the loan.  If you are certain that you are going to get a raise within the next couple of years and can refinance without a problem, those are plus factors.  All you need to do next is keep an immaculate credit score until then. If you meet these conditions, then a balloon mortgage is a great option.

Thoroughly evaluate your circumstances now, your financial situation, and your future income potential before you make a decision.

You may ask your lender for help in picking the right mortgage for you.  They will be more than happy to go through the pros and cons of a balloon mortgage with you so you can make a highly informed decision.